Geelong to host Wildlife Tourism Conference, September/October 2015

Geelong, Victoria will play host to Australia’s third National Wildlife Tourism Conference later this year, with this years conference theme “Wildlife Tourism: A Force for Biodiversity Conservation and Local Economies?”

What: Australia’s third National Wildlife Tourism Conference
Theme: “Wildlife Tourism: A Force for Biodiversity Conservation and Local Economies?”
When: 29 September to 2 October 2015
Where: Geelong, Victoria

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

Wildlife tourism is an important aspect of tourism, often offering experiences unique to the area visited. It includes viewing birds, whales, butterflies, kangaroos and other wildlife behaving naturally in their own habitats in the wild, well-run captive situations with native and other animals, and other wildlife experiences that can grab the imagination of all tourists or appeal to the specialist. It has the potential to provide employment in regional areas, stimulate local economies by encouraging tourists to spend an extra night (or week ), and support conservation by restoring or protecting habitat, breeding rare species, contributing financially or practically to conservation and research projects, or providing quality public education.

The structure of the conference will largely be presentations in the mornings and roundtable discussions in the afternoons – a structure that has proved successful and popular in previous workshops.

Major themes will include:

International aspects

  • How do other countries asses the value of, promote and manage wildlife tourism? What problems have they faced and what solutions have they found?
  • Which associations perform a similar role to Wildlife Tourism Australia in other countries, and what are their goals and activities?
  • What is new in wildlife tourism in our our nearest neighbours (New Zealand, New Guinea, Southeast Asia, Antarctica), and could there be more cross-promotion of wildlife travel between our countries, and promotion of our general region to the rest of the world?

Contributions of tourism to conservation

  • How are tour operations currently contributing to conservation of wildlife and their habitats (including monetary contributions, habitat restoration, public education, conservation breeding, citizen science etc.)?
  • What is the potential for increased contribution by wildlife tourism and the tourism industry in general to conservation of wildlife and habitats?

The value of wildlife tourism to local economies

  • What do we already know of the contributions of wildlife tourism to local and regional economies?
  • What kinds of wildlife tourism can encourage tourists to visit less-traveled regions, spend an extra night , or make repeat visits?
  • What obstacles are faced by small businesses and NGOs trying to stay afloat while offering high-quality wildlife experiences and interpretation to visitors?

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS – NOW OPEN

Who should attend?

  • Wildlife tour operators (including birding tours, whale-watching, reef-diving etc.)
  • Managers and other staff of ecolodges, rural B&Bs, farmstays etc. who offer bird-watching or other wildlife experiences
    general tour operators and guides who include wildlife-watching amongst their activities
  • Zoos, wildlife parks and museums
  • Researchers and students of wildlife tourism, ecotourism, nature tourism, nature interpretation/education and related topics
  • Conservation managers
  • Travel agents and tourism organizations
  • Local and state government bodies
  • Others with an interest in tourism which involves wildlife

To read more about the event, please click here.

(Image courtesy of Tourism Australia)

Geelong, Victoria will play host to Australia’s third National Wildlife Tourism Conference later this year, with this years conference theme “Wildlife Tourism: A Force for Biodiversity Conservation and Local Economies?”

What: Australia’s third National Wildlife Tourism Conference
Theme: “Wildlife Tourism: A Force for Biodiversity Conservation and Local Economies?”
When: 29 September to 2 October 2015
Where: Geelong, Victoria

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

Wildlife tourism is an important aspect of tourism, often offering experiences unique to the area visited. It includes viewing birds, whales, butterflies, kangaroos and other wildlife behaving naturally in their own habitats in the wild, well-run captive situations with native and other animals, and other wildlife experiences that can grab the imagination of all tourists or appeal to the specialist. It has the potential to provide employment in regional areas, stimulate local economies by encouraging tourists to spend an extra night (or week ), and support conservation by restoring or protecting habitat, breeding rare species, contributing financially or practically to conservation and research projects, or providing quality public education.

The structure of the conference will largely be presentations in the mornings and roundtable discussions in the afternoons – a structure that has proved successful and popular in previous workshops.

Major themes will include:

International aspects

  • How do other countries asses the value of, promote and manage wildlife tourism? What problems have they faced and what solutions have they found?
  • Which associations perform a similar role to Wildlife Tourism Australia in other countries, and what are their goals and activities?
  • What is new in wildlife tourism in our our nearest neighbours (New Zealand, New Guinea, Southeast Asia, Antarctica), and could there be more cross-promotion of wildlife travel between our countries, and promotion of our general region to the rest of the world?

Contributions of tourism to conservation

  • How are tour operations currently contributing to conservation of wildlife and their habitats (including monetary contributions, habitat restoration, public education, conservation breeding, citizen science etc.)?
  • What is the potential for increased contribution by wildlife tourism and the tourism industry in general to conservation of wildlife and habitats?

The value of wildlife tourism to local economies

  • What do we already know of the contributions of wildlife tourism to local and regional economies?
  • What kinds of wildlife tourism can encourage tourists to visit less-traveled regions, spend an extra night , or make repeat visits?
  • What obstacles are faced by small businesses and NGOs trying to stay afloat while offering high-quality wildlife experiences and interpretation to visitors?

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS – NOW OPEN

Who should attend?

  • Wildlife tour operators (including birding tours, whale-watching, reef-diving etc.)
  • Managers and other staff of ecolodges, rural B&Bs, farmstays etc. who offer bird-watching or other wildlife experiences
    general tour operators and guides who include wildlife-watching amongst their activities
  • Zoos, wildlife parks and museums
  • Researchers and students of wildlife tourism, ecotourism, nature tourism, nature interpretation/education and related topics
  • Conservation managers
  • Travel agents and tourism organizations
  • Local and state government bodies
  • Others with an interest in tourism which involves wildlife

To read more about the event, please click here.

(Image courtesy of Tourism Australia)

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