Rivergum Holiday Retreat achieve Nature Tourism certification

Congratulations to Rivergum Holiday Retreat for achieving Nature Tourism certification!

Rivergum Holiday Retreat is situated on the banks of the Murray River at Corowa, NSW, making it a perfect base to explore north east Victoria. They offer an excellent range of accommodation options, ranging from powered and unpowered sites for caravans and campers, to riverside bush camping, to deluxe cabins and studios, and pool-side villas and cottages. The site also boasts some fantastic facilities, including: a 1.5 km walking trail, two pools, two playgrounds, BBQ areas and a pizza oven, two boat ramps, tennis and basket ball courts and historic winery cellars.

Also part of the Rivergum Holiday Retreat is a 35 hectare Wetlands Nature Reserve, which supports local fauna and flora. Boasting Murray River Frontage, the natural bushland area is used for unpowered bush camping and picnics amongst the majestic rivergums, self-guided nature walks, and a self-guided fitness trail.

The team at Rivergum Holiday Retreat aim to foster sustainable and responsible environmental management, and minimise their impact on the environment where possible and practical. They have implemented renewable energy options with the installation of solar panels, and they work closely with local councils, Landcare, WIRES, staff, customers, and peers within the region to carry out projects and initiatives to benefit their Park and their region.

To find out more about Rivergum Holiday Retreat, visit their website.

Media Release: TripAdvisor GreenLeaders programme goes live in Australia for Earth Day

On Earth Day, TripAdvisor, the world’s largest travel Website, has formally announced that it has extended its successful TripAdvisor GreenLeaders™ programme into Australia and New Zealand.

The TripAdvisor GreenLeaders programme has been developed in consultation with the United Nations Environment Programme and Ecotourism Australia, with an aim to help travellers around the world plan and book greener trips by highlighting hotels and B&Bs engaging in environmentally-friendly practices. Tripadvisor’s GreenLeaders programme took out the Innovation Award in the 2015 Tourism for Tomorrow Awards last week at the Global Tourism Summit in Madrid.

27 ECO certified accommodation providers have achieved GreenLeader status, joining a futher 143 accommodation providers to become the first GreenLeaders in Australia and New Zealand. Ecotourism Australia’s partnership with the programme is an exclusive arrangement, where ECO Certified accommodation providers are automatically eligible for GreenLeader status. TripAdvisor’s criteria for the GreenLeaders programme has been acknowledged by Ecotourism Australia as an appropriate match for our ECO certification – our current members already exceeding nearly all of the requirements to become a GreenLeader.

Travellers can look out for the TripAdvisor GreenLeaders badge on a property’s listing page and click to see its green practices in place from linen and towel re-use, recycling and composting to solar panels, electric car charging stations and green roofing. Properties are tiered between Bronze, Silver, Gold or Platinum awards. The more green practices a property has, the higher the TripAdvisor GreenLeaders level it can achieve. After their stay, travellers are able to include their comments on the property’s environmental practices as part of their review.

According to a TripBarometer® survey by TripAdvisor, 71 percent of global travellers place importance on properties implementing eco-friendly practices, and 77 per cent of global hoteliers indicate they currently have green practices in place.

“More and more travellers around the world are placing importance on properties that implement eco-friendly practices,” said Ryan Dillon, Manager of Responsible Travel at TripAdvisor GreenLeaders. “With TripAdvisor GreenLeaders, we are pleased to help TripAdvisor’s 315 million travellers a month who use TripAdvisor by highlighting accommodations engaging in environmentally friendly practices.”

“Ecotourism is all inclusive. It’s for everyone now and plays an essential role in the future of hospitality. Our experience with TripAdvisor has been paramount and provides a trusted platform for communicating with travellers the benefits of staying in eco accommodation. We are continuously reducing our footprint and providing additional information to our guests about the significance of the local ecology. We have chosen to do this simply because we enjoy doing so, we believe it is the right thing to do so we gain a sense of satisfaction with each step we take and we are delighted that we now have the opportunity to highlight our Eco Tourism passion to potential customers via TripAdvisor,” said Liz Meagher, Owner of Angler’s Rest, also Ecotourism certified.

More information about the TripAdvisor GreenLeaders programme can be found at green.tripadvisor.com.au or green.tripadvisor.co.nz.

Read TripAdvisor’s full media release here.

For further information on the partnership, please contact Ecotourism Australia:
Rod Hillman, Chief Executive: ceo@ecotourism.org.au | 07 3252 1530

-Ends-

Geelong to host Wildlife Tourism Conference, September/October 2015

Geelong, Victoria will play host to Australia’s third National Wildlife Tourism Conference later this year, with this years conference theme “Wildlife Tourism: A Force for Biodiversity Conservation and Local Economies?”

What: Australia’s third National Wildlife Tourism Conference
Theme: “Wildlife Tourism: A Force for Biodiversity Conservation and Local Economies?”
When: 29 September to 2 October 2015
Where: Geelong, Victoria

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

Wildlife tourism is an important aspect of tourism, often offering experiences unique to the area visited. It includes viewing birds, whales, butterflies, kangaroos and other wildlife behaving naturally in their own habitats in the wild, well-run captive situations with native and other animals, and other wildlife experiences that can grab the imagination of all tourists or appeal to the specialist. It has the potential to provide employment in regional areas, stimulate local economies by encouraging tourists to spend an extra night (or week ), and support conservation by restoring or protecting habitat, breeding rare species, contributing financially or practically to conservation and research projects, or providing quality public education.

The structure of the conference will largely be presentations in the mornings and roundtable discussions in the afternoons – a structure that has proved successful and popular in previous workshops.

Major themes will include:

International aspects

  • How do other countries asses the value of, promote and manage wildlife tourism? What problems have they faced and what solutions have they found?
  • Which associations perform a similar role to Wildlife Tourism Australia in other countries, and what are their goals and activities?
  • What is new in wildlife tourism in our our nearest neighbours (New Zealand, New Guinea, Southeast Asia, Antarctica), and could there be more cross-promotion of wildlife travel between our countries, and promotion of our general region to the rest of the world?

Contributions of tourism to conservation

  • How are tour operations currently contributing to conservation of wildlife and their habitats (including monetary contributions, habitat restoration, public education, conservation breeding, citizen science etc.)?
  • What is the potential for increased contribution by wildlife tourism and the tourism industry in general to conservation of wildlife and habitats?

The value of wildlife tourism to local economies

  • What do we already know of the contributions of wildlife tourism to local and regional economies?
  • What kinds of wildlife tourism can encourage tourists to visit less-traveled regions, spend an extra night , or make repeat visits?
  • What obstacles are faced by small businesses and NGOs trying to stay afloat while offering high-quality wildlife experiences and interpretation to visitors?

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS – NOW OPEN

Who should attend?

  • Wildlife tour operators (including birding tours, whale-watching, reef-diving etc.)
  • Managers and other staff of ecolodges, rural B&Bs, farmstays etc. who offer bird-watching or other wildlife experiences
    general tour operators and guides who include wildlife-watching amongst their activities
  • Zoos, wildlife parks and museums
  • Researchers and students of wildlife tourism, ecotourism, nature tourism, nature interpretation/education and related topics
  • Conservation managers
  • Travel agents and tourism organizations
  • Local and state government bodies
  • Others with an interest in tourism which involves wildlife

To read more about the event, please click here.

(Image courtesy of Tourism Australia)

Geelong, Victoria will play host to Australia’s third National Wildlife Tourism Conference later this year, with this years conference theme “Wildlife Tourism: A Force for Biodiversity Conservation and Local Economies?”

What: Australia’s third National Wildlife Tourism Conference
Theme: “Wildlife Tourism: A Force for Biodiversity Conservation and Local Economies?”
When: 29 September to 2 October 2015
Where: Geelong, Victoria

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

Wildlife tourism is an important aspect of tourism, often offering experiences unique to the area visited. It includes viewing birds, whales, butterflies, kangaroos and other wildlife behaving naturally in their own habitats in the wild, well-run captive situations with native and other animals, and other wildlife experiences that can grab the imagination of all tourists or appeal to the specialist. It has the potential to provide employment in regional areas, stimulate local economies by encouraging tourists to spend an extra night (or week ), and support conservation by restoring or protecting habitat, breeding rare species, contributing financially or practically to conservation and research projects, or providing quality public education.

The structure of the conference will largely be presentations in the mornings and roundtable discussions in the afternoons – a structure that has proved successful and popular in previous workshops.

Major themes will include:

International aspects

  • How do other countries asses the value of, promote and manage wildlife tourism? What problems have they faced and what solutions have they found?
  • Which associations perform a similar role to Wildlife Tourism Australia in other countries, and what are their goals and activities?
  • What is new in wildlife tourism in our our nearest neighbours (New Zealand, New Guinea, Southeast Asia, Antarctica), and could there be more cross-promotion of wildlife travel between our countries, and promotion of our general region to the rest of the world?

Contributions of tourism to conservation

  • How are tour operations currently contributing to conservation of wildlife and their habitats (including monetary contributions, habitat restoration, public education, conservation breeding, citizen science etc.)?
  • What is the potential for increased contribution by wildlife tourism and the tourism industry in general to conservation of wildlife and habitats?

The value of wildlife tourism to local economies

  • What do we already know of the contributions of wildlife tourism to local and regional economies?
  • What kinds of wildlife tourism can encourage tourists to visit less-traveled regions, spend an extra night , or make repeat visits?
  • What obstacles are faced by small businesses and NGOs trying to stay afloat while offering high-quality wildlife experiences and interpretation to visitors?

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS – NOW OPEN

Who should attend?

  • Wildlife tour operators (including birding tours, whale-watching, reef-diving etc.)
  • Managers and other staff of ecolodges, rural B&Bs, farmstays etc. who offer bird-watching or other wildlife experiences
    general tour operators and guides who include wildlife-watching amongst their activities
  • Zoos, wildlife parks and museums
  • Researchers and students of wildlife tourism, ecotourism, nature tourism, nature interpretation/education and related topics
  • Conservation managers
  • Travel agents and tourism organizations
  • Local and state government bodies
  • Others with an interest in tourism which involves wildlife

To read more about the event, please click here.

(Image courtesy of Tourism Australia)