The Natural Environment – Australia’s Greatest Strength

Tourism Australia has revealed the outcomes of an international research project into how global consumers view Australia.  The research looked into what motivates them to visit and identifying the barriers and ‘triggers’ to travel to Australia.

Tourism Australia’s research has found that most markets have high expectations of Australia and, for those consumers that do visit, Australia performs strongly with the destination’s biggest strengths identified as its world class beauty, safe environment and welcoming people.

The research found that Australia is leading the world when it comes to the quality of its nature. 40% of respondents identified that nature is a ‘Top 5’ consideration when it comes to selecting a holiday destination, and Australia tops the ratings when it comes to world class beauty and natural environment.

Further major findings from the Australia Consumer Demand Research include:

  • Australia’s biggest strength is its world class nature, well regarded from all markets and core to our global tourism offering
  • The greatest drivers of international visitor demand to Australia are coastal (including beaches), aquatic and wildlife experiences, with Tropical North Queensland, Sydney and the Gold Coast continuing to rank highest for uniqueness and appeal
  • Australia rates No.1 for safety amongst those who have visited – people’s actual experiences scoring much higher than the perception of those who haven’t, particularly from India and lesser extent Indonesia and South Korea
  • Perceptions of Australia’s food and wine offering are mixed across markets, although rankings are very high amongst those who have visited and sampled, presenting significant future international marketing opportunities
  • Aspiration and intention to visit is very high across the board, however awareness of experiences within Australia and converting interest into actual visits for leisure or holiday travel is lower.

Tourism Australia MD Andrew McEvoy said the findings would contribute towards the industry achieving its Tourism 2020 goal, to increase tourism spending by up to $140b by the end of the decade, by improving understanding of consumers in Australia’s primary tourism export markets.

McEvoy also said, “By better understanding what motivates consumers in our key target markets, we’re clearly in a much better position to craft our message to convert awareness of our country into visits. It also gives Australian tourism operators valuable insights into how to adapt and develop their business to best attract new visitors”.

“We already know Australia has a rich array of unique and distinctive attractions and experiences to offer our visitors, but we need to keep our finger on the pulse of changing consumer preferences and expectations, particularly from Asian markets which are growing rapidly and undergoing significant demographic changes.”

“The findings suggest we’re already doing a lot right, in terms of where we are prioritising our resources and marketing activities. It’s encouraging, for example, that the highest levels of intention to visit are amongst Chinese and Indians, two of the markets Tourism Australia is most aggressively going after.”

“Equally, the survey has also identified some areas where the industry can up its game, including better promotion of our consistently high quality food and wine offering, where significant opportunities exist to strengthen what locals know to be core strength.”

To view the full research findings, follow the link or for more details on the Tourism 2020 Strategy please visit Tourism Australia’s website.

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